Horatio

Horatio
[Photo by Jacquelyn Griffin)

Monday, February 2, 2015

Academic Rigor Mortis?

When I attended college, I earned some money as a tutor to some of the basketball team. My best student was a young man who knew he didn't have the talent to go pro, but was fiercely determined to get an education financed through his sports scholarship. He wanted to make more of himself. He did, by dint of hard work.

From the Times:
The National Collegiate Athletic Association has long clung to the idea that college athletes are essentially engaged in extracurricular activities, but evidence to the contrary is mounting.

Football players might devote as many as 60 hours a week to their sport, with little time for studies. Graduation rates for Division I football and men’s basketball players hover around 50 percent, according to federal statistics. The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, has found that over the last two decades, some 3,000 students, about half of them athletes, took courses that sometimes did not meet or require any work. Two former players, Rashanda McCants and Devon Ramsay, filed a lawsuit in January claiming the university and N.C.A.A. failed to fulfill their stated missions of educating them.


Most college officials have focused reforms on sustaining academic standards and limiting sports participation. But to acknowledge reality — or what some consider the charade of college sports — others propose the opposite: more sports, as in offering varsity athletes academic credit, and perhaps a whole curriculum built around their sport, under the tutelage of learned coaches.
Oh, aye, that's a plan.

Frankly, I'm with Ripper on this one:

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